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About Us

About Us

The Crown Inn, formerly two cottages, has been a pub since around 1851 when the licence was transferred from the Bentink Arms at Bigly on the Ox Drove.

It was bought from the Wilton Estate by the then licensee in 1918.

Lot 119: The Crown Inn, Alvediston.

Situate in the centre of the village. A fully licenced house, Brick, stone and thatched containing bar, tap room and four bedrooms with detached stone and tile wash house and earth closet and detached brick and thatched stable.

The property is held by Messrs. Matthews and co, brewers, Gillingham, holding over on a yearly Michaelmas Tenancy, at an annual rate of £14.0s.od., the garden being Let at a further yearly rent of £1.0s.0d., a total of £15.0s.0d. Outgoing land tax 14s.0d.

A tale from the past...

Previous licensees George and Jane (1918) had 10 children with the youngest, Douglas, being involved in an incident which has gone down in the annals of family and village history.

When he was 18 months old, Douglas toddled to the well (which is still here today outside the B & B entrance door) and somehow managed to fall down the shaft, the well cover not being correctly in place. The well was 40ft deep with 15ft of water at the bottom, but Doug was saved by, of all things, his petticoat. In those days little boys wore dresses and when he hit the water the various layers of material acted as a buoyancy aid keeping him afloat.

As luck would have it Mr Henning, the local postman, was cycling by on his rounds and volunteered to be let down the well on a rope held by George, Douglas's father, since he was the lighter of the two. Baby and postman were hauled to safety amidst great rejoicing but extremely wet.

Mr Henning received a national award for his bravery.